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Going Organic

More than ever we all need to start going organic, once the majority starts buying regularly, the big industries will have to lower prices to compete

Phil J Webb's Blog

Prior to having a double lung transplant (the biggest surgery any person can have) my wife and I used to eat organic here and there. You know just to say we ate organic and try to trick our brains to think we did something healthy…not that we ate unhealthy a lot. However, after surgery we were told by the doctors and nutritionist to eat as much organic as possible.
Bottom line is they were trying to keep out any pesticides or foreign chemicals that would hinder the healing process or mess with all my medicine . We took heed to that suggestion, because the last thing you want is to find out something you ate made your body sick after having a $3M surgery!
We all know that eating healthy costs more. Organic foods are almost double what the non-organic food costs. Like bananas, organic from our store goes for…

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Going Organic

Prior to having a double lung transplant (the biggest surgery any person can have) my wife and I used to eat organic here and there. You know just to say we ate organic and try to trick our brains to think we did something healthy…not that we ate unhealthy a lot. However, after surgery we were told by the doctors and nutritionist to eat as much organic as possible.
Bottom line is they were trying to keep out any pesticides or foreign chemicals that would hinder the healing process or mess with all my medicine . We took heed to that suggestion, because the last thing you want is to find out something you ate made your body sick after having a $3M surgery!
We all know that eating healthy costs more. Organic foods are almost double what the non-organic food costs. Like bananas, organic from our store goes for $.99 lbs, non-organic is $.59 lbs. Being that potassium was and is needed for me, we buy a lot of bananas. We also know that organic foods don’t last as long, the bananas I get can go bad after about 4 days, non-organic about week. So we buy only 4 or 5 bananas at a time. I bet by now you’re tired of me saying bananas! OK moving on.
The cost of organic is higher simply because the crops don’t yield as much and the farmers tend to have a lot smaller crops over all. Have you ever seen a fruit or vegetable grove that goes for miles? Those aren’t organic and they have to use a plane in some areas to cover the crops in chemicals to keep the bugs away. Certified Organic farmers don’t use those harsh chemicals. The bugs that attack the organic farms are smarter, since they don’t eat chemicals, where is the other bugs that eat the chemical sprayed foods are more like the hippies from the 60’s. Lol just kidding
The same goes for eggs, milk, meats and packed foods. The choice to stay with this diet is flippen expensive, but the trade off is, knowing you’re eating better. For me, my body has been healing up well now. Not to say organic was the main factor, but I can say it certainly helps. By the way, organic milk tastes like it did when I was a kid.

Why am I posting this; it is because of the scare of listeria on the apples. Apples people! “An apple a day keeps the doctor away”. Hmm, not if it has a deadly bacteria. I don’t think I’ve heard of anyone getting sick from organic foods. But, it could happen. We wash all our fruits and vegetables prior to eating them, and so should you, regardless of where it comes from.

The best (in our opinion) fruits and vegetables come from a locally owned, organic farm. Because they know if they don’t produce good produce (did you see what I did there) they might find some of their cows tipped. Just kidding again. That actually hurts the cows, so don’t do it.

In closing, we all have choices to make when shoveling food in our pie holes, so do what you feel is right for you and enjoy!

Transplant

Be an organ donor, save lives!

Coconut Oil Touted as Alzheimer’s Remedy – CBN.com: http://youtu.be/ZZOR-Qd3QSg

This is a feature length script I wrote in Nov. 2014. It’s a ghost story, written for low budget, but of course could go big budget.

Property Manager Logline:

Fed up apartments Property Managers, this married couple chooses to manage a self-storage building of historical value instead, but, the ghost of Greta will haunts the couple until they give up or fight back.

Synopsis:
Married couple Steve and Erin have been property managers of apartment buildings long enough to know they are tired of dealing whining, complaining residents. They chose to switch positions and look into managing self-storage complex instead, thinking it will be quieter and easier than the headaches they have now. After several interviews, some rejections and a couple offers, the married couple choses to manager the historical building downtown, mostly because of its charm and nicer living space.
The old building has quiet the history, as it was once a thriving business in its day. But the business took a nasty turn when an older lady, Greta, dies during an argument with her boss. Soon after Greta’s death the company lost its good reputation and the business finally closed its doors and remained empty, until the storage company purchased it at an auction and renovated it to become a self-storage complex.
Now, after losing several on-site managers and struggling to keep the storage complex going the regional manager, Manny has hired Steve and Erin to run the place. Confident they have what it takes to keep the business afloat, Manny leaves on a well-deserved vacation. What he doesn’t know, is he’s leaving Steve and Erin with the ghost of Greta, who has chased out all the other managers. But with no money and nowhere to go, Steve and Erin must stay and find a way to fight back against Greta’s attacks. After all the physical abuse from Greta, this determined team finds a way to capture and release Greta with the help of her grandson Sven and get her out of the building and prove Manny was right in choosing them.

History TimelineHistoric OverviewHistory by YearOrigin of Wingfoot LogoA History of LeadershipThe Charles Goodyear StoryThe Wingfoot Express

The Charles Goodyear StoryThe Strange Story of Rubber

In midsummer of 1834 a bankrupt hardware merchant from Philadelphia, Charles Goodyear, walked into the New York retail store of the Roxbury India Rubber Co., America’s first rubber manufacturer. He showed the store manager a new valve he had devised for rubber life preservers. The manager shook his head sadly. The company wasn’t in the market for valves now; it would be lucky to stay in business at all.

He showed Goodyear why: rack on rack of rubber goods which had been melted to malodorous glue by the torrid weather. In the company’s factory at Roxbury, Mass., he confided, thousands of melted rubber articles were being returned by outraged customers. The directors had met in the dead of night to bury $20,000 worth of stinking rejects in a pit.

The “rubber fever” of the early 1830s had ended as suddenly as it had begun. At first everybody had wanted things made of the new waterproof gum from Brazil, and factories had sprung up to meet the demand. Then abruptly the public had become fed up with the messy stuff which froze bone-hard in winter and turned glue-like in summer. Not one of the young rubber companies survived as long as five years. Investors lost millions. Rubber, everyone agreed, was through in America.

Goodyear disappointedly pocketed the valve and took his first good look at rubber. He had played with bits of it as a child, but now, at 34, he experienced a sudden curiosity and wonder about this mysterious “gum elastic.” “There is probably no other inert substance,” he said later, “which so excites the mind.”

Returning to Philadelphia, Goodyear was clapped into jail for debt. It was not his first sojourn there, nor his last. He asked his wife to bring him a batch of raw rubber and her rolling pin. Here, in his cell, Goodyear made his first rubber experiments, kneading and working the gum hour after hour.

If rubber was naturally adhesive, he reasoned, why couldn’t a dry powder be mixed in to absorb its stickiness — perhaps the talc-like magnesia powder sold in drugstores? Out of jail again, he tried, with promising results.

He talked a boyhood friend into backing a modest venture. Charles, his wife and small daughters made up several hundred pairs of magnesia-dried rubber overshoes in their kitchen. But before he could market them summer came, and he watched his footwear sag into shapeless paste.

Neighbors complained about Goodyear’s smelly gum, so he moved his experiments to New York. There a friend gave him a fourth-floor tenement bedroom for his “laboratory.” A brother-in-law came to his squalid quarters, lectured him about his hungry children, advised him that rubber was dead. “I am the man to bring it back,” said Goodyear.

He was adding two drying agents to his rubber now, magnesia and quicklime, then boiling the mixture and getting a better product all the time. Impressed, a New York trade show awarded him a medal.

Goodyear lavished all the arts of decoration on his dingy samples, painted them, gilded them, embossed them. Running short of material one morning, he decided to re-use an old decorated sample and applied nitric acid to remove its bronze paint. The piece turned black, and Goodyear threw it away.

A few days later he remembered that somehow the blackened scrap had felt different. He retrieved it from his trash can and found he was right. The nitric acid had done something to the rubber, made it almost as smooth and dry as cloth. This was better rubber than anyone had ever made before.

A New York businessman advanced several thousand dollars to begin production. But the financial panic of 1837 promptly wiped out both the backer and the business. Destitute, Charles and his family camped in the abandoned rubber factory on Staten Island, living on fish he caught in the harbor.

Read the full story here:

http://www.goodyear.com/corporate/history/history_story.html